Here’s How You Can Detan Naturally Using Mango Pulp

Here's How You Can Detan Naturally Using Mango PulpNew

Summers are here in full swing and so is the need to binge on summer fruit like mango. Mango is not only delicious but also packs a host of health benefiting properties. It can do wonders for your overall health, provided it’s consumed in moderation. Other than its consumption, mango can be used on the face as well in the form of face packs. Mango pulp when applied onto the skin can treat a host of skin problems, one of which being tanned skin. With summer comes tanned skin. A lot of us look out for various beauty treatments to get rid of that summer tan. However, not many know that the same condition can be treated using natural stuff like mango. This humble summer fruit can be used to get rid of even the most stubborn tan. In order to get rid of that tanned skin, here are a few mango face packs that can come to great help. Read on to know how they can be applied.

1. Mango Pulp Face Pack

Having an uneven skin complexion could be a nightmare for many. In order to get rid of the same, mango pulp can prove to be quite beneficial. Mango has exfoliating properties that can help in keeping the skin well hydrated. Just extract mango pulp and rub it over your face for around 2-3 minutes. Allow it to stay for 5 minutes and rinse off with cold water. Doing so will help you bring back the glow back after a tan, further improving your skin complexion. Repeat the procedure thrice a week to see effective results.

mango pulp

Mango pulp can help you get rid of the summer tan

2. Mango And Besan Face Pack

This particular face pack can effectively keep tanned skin at bay. To make this face pack, you need to have pulp of ripe mango, two teaspoons of besan, 1/2 teaspoon of honey and few ground almonds. Take a bowl and add mango pulp in it. Then add Bengal gram flour (besan), almonds and honey into the pulp. Mix the ingredients properly to get a smooth paste-like consistency. Gently rub over the face and allow it to stay for around 10-12 minutes. Once it is done, rinse off with water. Use this face pack twice and watch out for results.

mango puree

This particular face pack can effectively keep tanned skin at bay

3. Mango And Curd Face Pack

If you happen to have an oily skin, then this face pack is just apt for you. Apart from the goodness of mangoes, this face pack has curd and honey as well. These ingredients are readily available in the kitchen and can help you fight with pigmentation and tanning in one go. Extract pulp from a ripe mango and add 1 tablespoon of curd and 1 teaspoons of honey in it. Mix the ingredients well. However, make sure that the face pack is of thick consistency. Apply this pack on your face and wash it off after 10 minutes.

curd face pack

This face pack will help you fight with pigmentation and tanning in one go

So, what are you waiting for? Make the most of this refreshing and healthy summer fruit by making the above mentioned face packs and say bye-bye to tanned skin.

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OPINION: Can a low-carb diet really cure autism?!

Image result for OPINION: Can a low-carb diet really cure autism?!

MY car started making the strangest thudding noise last week.

I double-parked at my local coffee shop and asked the bearded barista to have a look under the hood. After some examination, he poured a double shot soy latte into the oil compartment.

My Volkswagen Golf now billows choking smoke when I push on the clutch, but the noise went away, so… success!

Almost as absurd as this proposition is turning to a documentary about a diet for guidance on treating serious medical conditions.

And yet that’s what we’re being asked to do with the new Netflix series The Magic Pill.

It explores the controversial ketogenic diet and its apparent potential to eradicate common chronic illnesses like autism.

It argues that the modern diet is to blame for such diseases and therefore, changing what you eat can cure illness.

The Magic Pill presents a number of examples to prove its case, including a young girl who suffers autism but experiences a miraculous improvement in her symptoms when she improves her eating habits.

pill
Netflix/Supplied

Before she switched to the high-fat, low-carb diet, Abigail’s meals consisted entirely of processed chicken fingers, goldfish cracker biscuits and artificially flavoured apple.

After, her parents say her bowel movements improved and she was able to concentrate thanks to the more nutritious food she consumed.

Well, no shit.

Healthy eating improves the way your body functions and the way you feel. No one is disputing that or saying it’s a bad thing, and anyone encouraging Australians – among the most obese in the world – to ditch bad habits should be praised.

Where I have a problem with the almost evangelical tone of this film is what happens next.

Abigail’s parents are so unquestionably impressed with the results that they decide to stop giving her medically prescribed and vital anti-seizure medication.

They do this without consulting their doctor – a trained specialist – and instead rely on the diet.

The Australian Medical Association has criticised the film, with the body’s president Michael Gannon declaring it “dangerous”.

“The idea that a high-fat diet can change a child’s behaviour in a month is just so patently ridiculous,” he told The Daily Telegraph. “And yet the reality is the parents of autistic children are so desperate they will reach for anything.”

Medicine belongs in the hands of doctors and science is not some abstract idea.

While eating better can improve your health and quality of life, relying on a miracle diet alone to cure disease is a stupid prospect.

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Can the Mediterranean Diet Protect You Against Air Pollution Health Risks?

Image result for The Mediterranean diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and olive oil. G.steph.rocket / CC BY-SA 4.0The Mediterranean diet emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and olive oil. G.steph.rocket / CC BY-SA 4.0

Air pollution is a serious and growing public health concern. Ninety-five percent of the Earth’s population breathes unsafe air, and scientists are discovering more and more health risks associated with doing so.

However, since the solution to air pollution depends on political decisions and technological innovation, it is hard for individuals to know how to protect themselves. Until now. A new study has found that eating a Mediterranean diet might limit the long-term health impacts of certain types of deadly air pollution, Time reported Monday.

Researchers at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine compared the health outcomes for almost 550,000 Americans near the age of 62 over 17 years based on their exposure to particulate matter, nitrous oxide and ozone and how closely their eating habits matched the Mediterranean diet of fruits, vegetables, fish, poultry, legumes, whole grains and olive oil. They found that Mediterranean-type eaters were less likely than others to die after exposure to particulate matter and nitrous oxide.

The findings were presented at the American Thoracic Society 2018 International Conference taking place from May 18 to 23 in San Diego.

“[A]doption of a Mediterranean diet has the potential to reduce the effects of air pollution in a substantial population in the United States,” senior study author George Thurston said in a press release published by ScienceDaily.

Thurston explained that the Mediterranean diet is high in antioxidants, so the findings backed the hypothesis that air pollution harms human health by increasing inflammation.

“Given the benefits we found of a diet high in anti-oxidants, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that particle air pollution caused by fossil fuel combustion adversely affects health by inducing oxidative stress and inflammation,” he said.

The study builds on previous research indicating that an antioxidant rich diet can mitigate the health impacts of short-term exposure to air pollution.

“What we did not know was whether diet can influence the association between long-term air pollution exposure and health effects,” NYU School of Medicine doctoral student Chris C. Lim said in the press release.

They found that, for those who did not stick to a Mediterranean diet, deaths overall increased by 5 percent for every 10 parts per billion (ppb) increase in long-term nitrous oxide exposure, compared to 2 percent for those who followed the diet most strictly.

When it came to cardiovascular disease deaths, those increased by 10 percent per 10 ppb increase in nitrous oxide exposure for those who least followed the diet compared to two percent for those who most followed it.

Heart attack deaths due to nitrous oxide exposure increased by 12 percent per ppb compared to 4 percent per ppb for the least and most adherent to the diet.

For particulate matter, cardiac disease deaths increased by 17 percent per 10 micrgrams per cubic meter of increased exposure for those who least followed the diet compared to 5 percent per 10 micrograms per cubic meter for those who most followed it, and heart attack deaths increased by 20 percent per 10 micrograms per cubic meter for the least adherent compared to 5 percent for the most faithful.

Following a Mediterranean diet was not found to improve health outcomes following ozone exposure.

While Time pointed out that more research needs to be done before it is assured that a dietary change can provide a bulwark against air pollution, you won’t hurt your health, or your taste buds, by switching to a Mediterranean diet just in case.

As Lim told Time, “Eat your veggies.”

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