Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime 2 launched in India

It’s been a busy week at Samsung, as they have launched a successor to yet another budget smartphone. The new Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime 2 smartphone is available on the Samsung India website at a price tag of INR 13990/-. It’s interesting to note that this phone currently stands “sold out” on the website and there is a “notify me” option for when it becomes “available”. I can’t wrap my mind around this “sold out” business. If it were the S9 or the S9+, it would have made sense, but with the J7 Prime 2 being sold out, this just doesn’t stick well.

samsung galaxy j7 prime 2

Like all budget phones, the tech and features of the Samsung Galaxy J7 Prime 2 are very basic and average. Here is where the J7 Prime 2 stands. The phone has a 5.5 inch full HD (1080 x 1920 pixels) TFT display with Corning Gorilla Glass. The metal unibody houses a 1.6GHz Octa core Exynos 7 processor with 3GB RAM and 32 GB internal storage, which is expandable up to 128 GB via micro SD card slot. Also sharing the space is a 3300 mAh battery, that is supposed to offer 20+ hours of talk-time on 3G WCDMA. This makes the phone to be 151.7 x 75.0 x 8.0 mm on scale and it weighs 170 grams, same as its older brother the J7 Prime.

The rear camera on this phone is a 13 MP with f/1.9 aperture, autofocus and flash and is enabled to record in FHD (1920 x 1080) video at 30 fps. The front camera is also 13 MP. Samsung has given the social cam feature in built in the camera App UI, and add on features include live stickers to photos, live filters etc.

samsung galaxy j7 prime 2

In the connectivity department, the Galaxy J7 prime 2 has 4G, 3G, Wi-Fi 802.11 b/g/n, GPS, Bluetooth v4.1, GPS, Glonass, Beidou, Wi-Fi Direct, a USB 2.0 charging port and a 3.5mm headset jack. The Galaxy J7 Prime 2 has been revealed in two colours, namely Black and Champagne Gold

Galaxy J7 Prime 2 comes equipped with Samsung Pay mini as well as the Samsung Mall. The phone also has built in features of Accelerometer, Fingerprint Sensor and Proximity Sensor. The Samsung Mall feature lets users point their camera to an object and search for similar products in real-time across shopping sites. How good it does the task of the Samsung Mall, we shall have to wait to find out.

[“Source-cartoq”]

Google Launchpad’s Solve for India Mentors 10 Startups

Google Launchpad's Solve for India Mentors 10 Startups

In an effort to mentor emerging start-ups, Google Indiahosted a four-day boot camp for the first 10 Indian startups as part of its ‘Solve for India’ programme.

Launched last year as an India-only pilot for mentorship by Google Developers’ “Launchpad” team, ‘Solve for India’ focuses on bringing the best of Google expertise to help emerging startups in Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) and build solutions for the country in varied fields.

“We shortlisted 10 startups from 160 home-grown start-ups by travelling across 15 cities in India, and are now ready to scale this pilot as a dedicated programme for India,” said Karthik Padmanabhan, Developer Relations Lead, Google India.

The participants were the founders of startups, including Nebulaa, Slang Labs, PregBuddy, LegalDesk, PaySack, Vokal, FarMart, Meesho, Pratilipi and M-Indicator.

“The quality insights received from mentors of diverse backgrounds has helped us rethink our approach of reaching out to millions of farmers in India,” said Mehtab Singh Hans, Co-Founder, FarMart.

“We’re delighted to share that we will be expanding the mentoring support beyond this boot camp, by launching a structured mentorship programme for startups who are using ML and AI to ‘Solve for India,'” said Paul Ravindranath G, Programme Manager, Launchpad Accelerator, Google India.

[“source=gadgets.ndtv”]

How to Turn Any Part of Your Windows Desktop into a GIF

Image result for How to Turn Any Part of Your Windows Desktop into a GIF

GIF: David Murphy

Gif. Jif. No matter your pronunciation preference, it’s easy to create that wordusing a variety of apps and services. Since I started working at Lifehacker, I’ve found that it’s sometimes easier to show, not tell, in the form of a little animated image that demonstrates some key feature or setting. Consequently, I’ve started making a lot of GIFs, and here’s the app I use to do it on Windows.

The app ScreenToGif is GreatToHave for making GIFs

I don’t recall where I stumbled across ScreenToGif, but I love this app. When you first pull it up, you’re presented with a simple menu that shows off the app’s four key functions: Recording your screen and turning that into a GIF, transforming the silly faces you make into your webcam into a GIF, launching a digital whiteboard and turning your scribbles into a GIF, and a general editor you can use to take existing files (like MP4 videos) and make them GIFs.

Screenshot: David Murphy

For the screen-recording bit, click on the big red Recorder icon and a fun little window overlay will appear—a picture frame of-sorts that you resize around the area you want to capture. Set your desired frames-per-second and hit F7 to start your recording and F8 to stop.

Screenshot: David Murphy

As soon as you stop recording, ScreenToGif launches its editor and automatically loads whatever it is you just captured. The GIF editor is kind of like a simplified video editor—since a GIF and a video both create the appearance of motion in similar (but identical) ways.

You can go through your potential GIF frame by frame and trim or delete that which you don’t want in the final product. You can also add or reduce the amount of time between each frame (to shorten or lengthen the speed of your GIF), move frames around, add transitions and slides, and pepper your GIF with witty text captions or other overlay elements.

Hop on board the one-mana pain train.
Screenshot: David Murphy

When you’re ready to create your GIF (File >> Save As), you can encode it using a variety of options (including FFMPEG and Gifski). Each will give you a different combination of quality and file size, so be sure to try a few to figure out which is best for your GIF-making needs. Here are a few I created using the 1.0, 2.0, and Gifski encoders, respectively:


Do you have a Windows app (paid or free) that you absolutely love? Tell us about it:david.murphy@lifehacker.com.

[“Source-lifehacker”]